Nadia Strohrer

Nadia Stohrer joined Whirlpool as their first Social Media Analyst in 2013.

“It was a brand new role on a brand new team, and that really allowed me to make it what I wanted it to be,” she says.

And for SocialMedia.org member Nadia, that meant serving the company’s brands like Whirlpool, KitchenAid, Maytag, Amana, and more from within their digital center of excellence. In her role, Nadia supports brand managers with best practices and consulting on social media initiatives.

She says her previous agency experience has helped her relate to the agencies working with Whirlpool’s brands now.

“The agencies come up with marketing ideas and pitch them to the brands, and I’m essentially the brand’s consultant — sharing best practices and letting them know if it’s a good idea or if it should be pushed in a different direction.”

And with agencies handling their community management and content creation, Nadia supports their brands with campaign analysis and aligning their internal KPIs and business objectives.

“Benchmarking against our competitors is great, but benchmarking against the best in social media is better.”

I look forward to finding other ways to allow the customer’s voice to be heard through social media and help shape the company’s future.

Another key part of her role: Helping the company learn from other’s mistakes.

Nadia says when things go wrong for other brands in social, she uses it as an opportunity to update Whirlpool’s social media policies. For example, when Duane Reade ran into legal trouble for using a photo of Katherine Heigl in a tweet without her permission, Nadia met with her legal team to develop a plan to avoid a similar situation.

She says that kind of planning gave them an opportunity later to capitalize on a celebrity endorsement. On The Howard Stern Show, Kid Rock mentioned his love for the Maytag appliances he keeps in his double-wide trailers. With the help of the legal team, Nadia determined that since the celebrity had initiated the endorsement, it was appropriate to respond with a shout out in social.

“We decided that was a risk worth taking if legal was heavily involved in it from a monitoring and approving standpoint,” she says.

To spread social media best practices to the rest of the company, Nadia works across brand siloes.

They hold weekly staff meetings with every brand manager and the corporate communications team to get on the same page. Teams are also expected to share wrap-up reports for each of the campaigns with start and end dates. They report on the tactics, what worked, and what didn’t.

“That way if KitchenAid wanted to mimic a Twitter party Whirlpool hosted, then we would have the results, how they did it, and what they could have done better.”

Whirlpool’s come a long way in terms of social media analytics since Nadia started, and she sees it going even further.

Like most industries in 2012, Whirlpool had minimal social media monitoring. But today, they’re using social listening and engagement to not only monitor brand sentiment and customer care, but also to inform product development and create real-time marketing opportunities.

During the Grammy’s, Whirlpool held a contest asking fans to submit a video of themselves singing a Johnny Cash song. The winner had their video featured in a 30-second ad during the event. For KitchenAid, a poll with their social fans helped the brand pick a new color for their popular stand-up mixers.

“I look forward to finding other ways to allow the customer’s voice to be heard through social media and help shape the company’s future.”

Nadia has been a member of SocialMedia.org since 2013. Say hi on Twitter and ask her how newlywed life is going.


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